Maine at 200 Series

Maine Historical Society is running a fantastic series of virtual bicentennial programs between now and next March.

You can view their scheduled events and register for them here: Maine Historical Society, Maine at 200

Wednesday, October 14, 6:00 – 7:00 pm

Maine at 200 Series: A Talk with John Bunker
An Apple History of Maine

An Apple History of Maine

For 45 years John Bunker has been pulling over by the side of the road to marvel at ancient apple trees, has picked his way through old books and diaries, hung out with old timers, grafted new trees, and made lots of pies, sauce and cider in his quest to re-discover and the identify the forgotten apple varieties of Maine.

As the crisp autumn air beckons the smell of fallen leaves and apple pie, this unique talk will explore the history of apple farming in Maine’s 16 counties from its colonial beginnings to the present.

Cost: Free and open to the public. Registration is required.

Location: online via Zoom. Limited to 500 attendees. REGISTER HERE

BUY THE BOOK from our online store.

Thursday, October 22, 6:00 – 7:00 pm

Maine at 200 Series: A Talk with Liam Riordan
Becoming Maine

Liam Riordan

Liam Riordan

A fascinating look at how Maine became a state. This illustrated presentation explores the long statehood process that culminated in 1820 with Maine’s separation from Massachusetts. That struggle engaged a range of challenging public issues that are still recognizable today. Four broad themes that bridge 200 years in telling ways include: the “two Maines” and sharp partisan conflict, the explosive place of slavery vis-a-vis the Maine-Missouri Crisis, Wabanaki sovereignty, the uncertain location and meaning of the international border.

About the speaker: Liam Riordan has done considerable Public History work to commemorate the bicentennial of the state of Maine in 2019-2020 and organized the Maine Bicentennial Conference on the statehood era and its legacy. He received his bachelor’s degree in history at the University of California, Berkeley, and his doctorate at the University of Pennsylvania. He has been a faculty member in the Department of History at the University of Maine since 1997. A specialist on the American Revolution — especially the religious, racial and ethnic diversity in the Philadelphia region from 1770 to 1830 — Professor Riordan has an ongoing research project about Loyalists who opposed the Revolution.

Cost: Free and open to the public. Registration is required.

Location: online via Zoom. Limited to 500 attendees. REGISTER HERE.

November Programs

Thursday, November 5, 6:00 – 8:00 pm

Maine at 200 Series: Presented by Maine-Wabanaki REACH
Exploring Wabanaki/Maine History: TENTATIVE PENDING PANDEMIC PROTOCOL/PROGRAM CHANGES

Exploring Wabanaki/Maine History: TENTATIVE PENDING PANDEMIC PROTOCOL/PROGRAM CHANGES

TENTATIVE PENDING PANDEMIC PROTOCOL/PROGRAM CHANGES

Maine Historical Society and Maine Wabanaki-REACH invite you to a powerful and unique interactive story-telling and learning experience. We will learn about events in the 450 year colonizing history of Wabanaki people (the Indigenous people of Maine) and Europeans and their descendants. This is a participatory program appropriate for adults and teens. Our goal is to increase public understanding of colonization. Attendance is limited and registration is required.

About Maine-Wabanaki REACH: Maine-Wabanaki REACH is a cross-cultural collaboration that successfully supported the Maine Wabanaki-State Child Welfare Truth and Reconciliation Commission. REACH is implementing the Commission’s recommendations, focused on Wabanaki health, wellness and self-determination and community building. REACH envisions and prepares for a future where Maine and Wabanaki people join together, acknowledging truth, promoting healing and creating change.

Cost: Free and open to the public. Attendance Limited. REGISTRATION REQUIRED — DETAILS FORTHCOMING.

Location: To be determined.

Wednesday, November 11, 6:00 – 7:00 pm

Maine at 200 Series: With James E. Francis, Sr (Penobscot)
Pandemics in Wabanaki Communities

James Eric Francis Sr. (Penobscot)

James Eric Francis Sr. (Penobscot)

James Eric Francis, Sr. (Penobscot), Director of Cultural and Historic Preservation, Penobscot Nation talks with Steve Bromage, Executive Director of Maine Historical Society about how pandemics have affected Wabanaki communities since the first Europeans interacted with Wabanaki people on the shores of what is now known as Maine to today’s concerns about COVID-19.

About the speaker: James E. Francis, Sr. is the Penobscot Nation’s Tribal Historian and Director of Cultural and Historic Preservation, for which he studies the relationship between Maine Native Americans and the landscape. Prior to working at the Penobscot Nation, he served with the Wabanaki Studies Commission, helping to implement the new Maine Native American Studies Law into Maine schools, and managed a team of teachers and cultural experts in developing a curriculum. An historical researcher, photographer, filmmaker, and graphic artist, Mr. Francis co-produced a film, Invisible, which examines racism experienced by Native Americans in Maine and the Canadian Maritimes.

Cost: Free and open to the public. Registration required.

Location: online via Zoom, limited to 500 attendees. REGISTER HERE

Thursday, November 12, 7:00 – 9:00 pm

With Dr. Ardis Cameron
Representing Race in Mid-Century Maine Film: Screening of LOST BOUNDARIES (1949)

Representing Race in Mid-Century Maine Film: Screening of LOST BOUNDARIES (1949)

In partnership with University of Maine – Augusta
Join us for the screening of LOST BOUNDARIES (1949, Alfred Werker, director) followed by a facilitated discussion with USM Professor Dr. Ardis Cameron.

The film is based on the William Lindsay White’s book of the same name and narrates the experiences of a black doctor who passes for white to work in a New England hospital. Based on the real story of a black family in early 20th century New England, LOST BOUNDARIES was filmed in Kittery and York, Maine, as well as parts of New Hampshire, and released in 1949.

Historically, this film is part of the movement that spawned socially conscious films in Hollywood in the 1930’s and 40s, but few such films directly addressed racism in New England. This film provides an opportunity to consider the larger context of racial politics in mid-century Maine and the significance of setting a story of racial “passing” in New England.

Cost: Free and open to the public, registration is required.

Location: online via Zoom, limited to 500 attendees
REGISTER FOR THE PROGRAM

Monday, November 30, 7:00 pm

Performed by Gerald Dickens
A Christmas Carol

TENTATIVE PENDING PANDEMIC PROTOCOL/PROGRAM CHANGES

Charles Dickens’ literary masterpiece, A Christmas Carol, continues to shape the way we celebrate Christmas over 150 years after the story of Ebenezer Scrooge and the three spirits of Christmas first touched hearts in 1843.

Join us in welcoming the author’s great-great grandson, renowned actor Gerald Dickens, to perform his uniquely powerful one-man stage adaptation of A Christmas Carol. MHS is again proud to host Mr. Dickens as he brings the classic Christmas story to life on stage in a performance that you’ll remember for many Christmases yet to come!

Cost: Ticket prices TBD at www.mainehistory.org when available. DETAILS FORTHCOMING.

Location: To be determined.

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